Stomp! A (very late) Review by Bertrude and Gertrude.

Bertrude:

There’s little to say that hasn’t already been said about the extraordinary “Stomp” stage show.  A one and three-quarter hours performance that exudes energy and flamboyance.

Void of any conventional musicality, it is a  celebration of rhythm reminiscent of the sentiment expressed by Sammy Davis Jnr in his signature tune, The Rhythm of Life.  This is a show that has to be seen to be believed, if only for its therapeutic value.  It’s said in traditional Chinese medicine that 10,000 finger tip beats on the scalp is a cure for baldness.  Likewise, Stomp brings warmth and health  to the soul.

Born of a curiousity for anything percussive, Stomp sometimes overwhelms the listener with a relentless cacophany that is hypnotic and bewildering.  This, in my view, was the only downside as there was little room left for a quiet, introspective or ‘pianissimo’ moment:  a little more sensitivity would have been appreciated at some points.

The key to such a corporeal performance that requires great dexterity and independence between hands and feet would seem to be in many hours of reherarsal.  The 16th note phrasing in common and complex time, requiring great skill, was simply beautiful.

Gertrude:

I wouldn’t ask these people to sweep my floor or do my dishes.  They break stuff.  It’s a kind of delightful, organised anarchy that inspires admiration and envy.   I mean, who can honestly say they’ve never wanted to smash a broom to bits?  I know I have.

There’s also some amazing dance moves, and aerial work.  I swear that one guy practically floated on the stage without the aid of ropes or tricks:  just sheer physical exuberance.  And he was banging garbage lids together while he did it.

Also some genuinely comedic moments, all presented clown-like in the universal language of the body, with simple and original  rhythmic props for accompaniment

I have to admit:  I did stick my fingers in my ears during the really loud bits.  Earplugs might not be a bad idea for the sensitive.

Comments are closed.