Paris

Paris, Masters Exhibition. National Gallery, Parkes. December to April
Bic Parker, Special Correspondent

I attended the National Art Gallery, paid my sixteen dollars entry and went in to  see what the fuss was all about. Initially one is confronted with the daunting and large works by the flag bearer for the post impressionist movement, Claude Monet, who provides us with an insight into this exhibition, in as much, as this collection contains private, personal and what I consider to be the essence of the relationship between artist and subject the application of paint, brush strokes, basically the construction.

Not having taken advantage of the guided tour (a volunteer service), I twoed and froed between Vincent’s starry night and Monet’s ballet dancers. Just quietly, I am  an avid lover of art, especially of this period and these particularly tormented souls. Tears welled within, tears of joy, appreciation, as I beheld these insights into these artists. Another thing that strikes me about these paintings is their casualness, in as much as they could be a random page ripped out of the artist’s personal  diary.

Look it is possibly not the best exhibition ever, but it is here and I don’t intend going over there to see them, they won’t come back and they won’t go anywhere else, only home to their permanent display which is currently being renovated, so I suppose we should be thankful that we can house them here in one of the best galleries in the world.

I took advantage of my location and wandered around the rest of the gallery checking out artists such as Warhol ,de Kooning, Jackson Pollock’s  Blue Poles…

If you engage a staff member they jump at the chance to interact with the public and in my case I tripped an alarm (got too close) and had a very enlightened chat about an airbrushed painting which looks like a black and white photo and was further regaled with conversation about the storage, transportation of the bigger works of art.

The gallery is installing new exhibits and will definitely feature in my cultural calender in the future months.

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